Datavideo TC devices

Hello CG team!

I would like to ask if anybody in this forum uses datavideo TC-100 or TC-200 for caspar output and could tell about workflow, quality and other things?

I’m very interested how that device generates key and if everything is ok with that key (sync and other things).

Thanks in advice!

I was the one that made us support this, but alas I do not own one. I just found it a good and cheap solution to get a single channel SDI fill and key out from a laptop without a Thunderbolt interface.

AFAIK the quality is good. The way it outputs the fill and key is very clever. It comes from the fact, that broadcast video used the YUV color model with a reduced resolution for U and V. This is sometimes refereed to as 4:2:2. In contrast to it computer graphics uses RGB in full resolution on all color channels. So if you will you have 4:4:4. By using only 2 of the 3 color channels, one for the Y (4) and one for a combination of U and V (2+2=4) you end up with a spare color channel to output the key (also 4). That is all the magic.

What is a bit strange is, that it only has a SDI in to use as a reference and not the usual black-burst composite video. But that should not be a problem, that can not be solved.

Thanks @didikunz for opinion! Maybe you have some testing videos from then when you were making support? Or maybe somebody has testing videos or end-to-end usage video? :slight_smile:

Hahaha, you understand me miss. I just posted a feature request on GitHub and commented a few times on it. The hard work here is done by other genius guys. I guess you would not see much on the testing videos, except a graphic keyed over a video. No difference here.

Oh, I got you. I’m just curious to see config and others workflow things. :slight_smile:

@didikunz, btw, does colors of cg output impact because of that color thing that you wrote above? :slight_smile:

What do you mean? I just explained the “physics” of the way the colors were output with the DataVideo box.

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